MIGC 2016 Call for Creative Work

The 11th Annual Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference (MIGC)

IN PROCESS
CALL FOR CREATIVE SUBMISSIONS (CLOSED)

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Dr. Levi Bryant (Collin College)
WORKSHOP CONDUCTED BY: Dr. Nick Montfort (MIT)

University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee
February 19–20, 2016
Extended Deadline: December 14, 2015

“Do you see the slightest evidence anywhere in the universe that creation came to an end with the birth of man? Do you see the slightest evidence anywhere out there that man was the climax toward which creation had been straining from the beginning? ...Very far from it.”

― Daniel Quinn, Ishmael

What is meant when we consider something to be in process?  

The process suggests movement along a sequence of conditions: it is the fermentation of an ancient ale, linguistic migrations,  the grind to level 90, interactive fictions, the nodes of grassroots journalism, rotted infrastructures, the recovery of New Orleans. To exist within process is to be undetermined. If the anticipated ends are repeatedly achieved, however, a process becomes convention over time. In other words, whether perceived as a dynamic undulation and recombination of qualities or a persistent practice, the process are those conditions that constitute becoming.

When we recognize that something is in process, how do we negotiate the currents of its past, immediate, and potential states? When we speak of the process in scholarship, we are discerning what Bryant refers to as the “entanglements” of its components and how they influence one another (Democracy of Objects, 32). As the academy increasingly resembles the experimental sandbox, we find ourselves with opportunities to jump in, get dirty, and extract these relationships.

This year’s Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference (MIGC) will host a series of events that will help us pause, extract, and dissect the “entanglements” that comprise the uncertain terrain of the Process, focusing on the various processes that move, compose, and become the world in an effort to open new opportunities to reveal new perspectives. MIGC invites submissions across disciplines, fields, and media that engage with the concept of being In Process. As a consideration that spans the academy and our communities, we request proposals that highlight work that, from a critical standpoint, focuses upon a specific process or set of processes distinct to one’s scholarly pursuits. Proposals may also focus on particular elements such as figures, formulas, structures, or objects that factor prominently within a process.

MIGC invites creative submissions that respond to our theme of In Process which may take the form of film, performance, poetry or fiction reading, dance, music, or art installation pieces. Accepted submissions will be shown, performed, or displayed throughout the conference. Artists whose work is displayed in the main conference hall will have a scheduled “walk and talk” where conference attendees will be able to look at the work displayed and speak with the respective artists about their piece. Select submissions will be performed and shown at our Creative Showcase Event on Friday night, February 19th, at Microlights film and independent art/house in Riverwest (seats 60). Those who wish to present on a panel with a written talk about their art might consider applying to our CFP on our website instead. All artists are encouraged to attend the entire conference. 

Presentations should preferably be between 5-10 minutes, although longer time slots are available and will be considered as well. A question and answer period will be scheduled for all artists and presenters, so artists should be present. Please include a 250-word description of your project in relation to the theme In Process and, if possible a small sample of your creative work (.mp3, .jpeg, .tif, .avi, .mp4, .doc(x), or PDF files, or a link to a website). Please send your sample via email tothemigc@gmail.com. Proposals must be submitted below by December 14th, 2015.

If applicable, please be sure to include space requirements as well as all necessary materials or equipment in your submission.

Possible areas of inquiry may include but are not limited to:

  • Ecological processes and resource management

  • Effects of social policies and civic structures upon communities

  • Transitions of identity, gender, race, and/or creed

  • Procedural and generative works of text, image, and/or sound

  • Theoretical considerations of engineering or manufacturing processes

  • Computational logics and structures; data visualization

  • Elements of a form or materials in tension with one another

  • Film development and video production

MIGC 2016 CFP

The 11th Annual Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference (MIGC)

IN PROCESS
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS (CLOSED)

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Dr. Levi Bryant (Collin College)
WORKSHOP CONDUCTED BY: Dr. Nick Montfort (MIT)

University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee
February 19–20, 2016
Extended Deadline: December 14, 2015

“Do you see the slightest evidence anywhere in the universe that creation came to an end with the birth of man? Do you see the slightest evidence anywhere out there that man was the climax toward which creation had been straining from the beginning? ...Very far from it.”

― Daniel Quinn, Ishmael

What is meant when we consider something to be in process?  

The process suggests movement along a sequence of conditions: it is the fermentation of an ancient ale, linguistic migrations,  the grind to level 90, interactive fictions, the nodes of grassroots journalism, rotted infrastructures, the recovery of New Orleans. To exist within process is to be undetermined. If the anticipated ends are repeatedly achieved, however, a process becomes convention over time. In other words, whether perceived as a dynamic undulation and recombination of qualities or a persistent practice, the process are those conditions that constitute becoming.

When we recognize that something is in process, how do we negotiate the currents of its past, immediate, and potential states? When we speak of the process in scholarship, we are discerning what Bryant refers to as the “entanglements” of its components and how they influence one another (Democracy of Objects, 32). As the academy increasingly resembles the experimental sandbox, we find ourselves with opportunities to jump in, get dirty, and extract these relationships.

This year’s Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference (MIGC) will host a series of events that will help us pause, extract, and dissect the “entanglements” that comprise the uncertain terrain of the Process, focusing on the various processes that move, compose, and become the world in an effort to open new opportunities to reveal new perspectives. MIGC invites submissions across disciplines, fields, and media that engage with the concept of being In Process. As a consideration that spans the academy and our communities, we request proposals that highlight work that, from a critical standpoint, focuses upon a specific process or set of processes distinct to one’s scholarly pursuits. Proposals may also focus on particular elements such as figures, formulas, structures, or objects that factor prominently within a process.

In its eleventh incarnation, MIGC is dedicated to the graduate student as inhabiting a state of becoming. Having achieved so much yet still uncertain, MIGC celebrates the academic in process by providing a welcoming and inclusive environment which fosters robust discussion and debate.

Please submit an abstract or project description of no longer than 300 words no later than Monday, December 14, 2015, to our submission portal below.

In addition to conference paper proposals, we welcome posters, demonstrations, interactive games, apps, digital and other artifacts, tools, projects, or websites that address the theme of being In Process. We hope that a wide range of graduate students working in the biological and environmental sciences, digital humanities, architecture, urban planning, mathematics, the arts, performance, the digital humanities, etc., whose work may not be suited to a conference paper but who would like to participate in mediums appropriate to their respective fields will also submit to this CFP.

We seek those working in, but not limited to, the following fields of study:

Biological Sciences
Environmental Sciences
Political Science
History
Public Health        
Economics
Mathematics        
Law
Utopian Studies        
Psychoanalysis
Architecture        
Urban Planning
Queer Theory        
Affect Studies
Disability Studies    
Critical Race Theory
Game Studies        
Digital Humanities
Anthropology        
Philosophy
Literary Studies        
Film Studies
Performance Studies   
Information Sciences
Art History        
Media Studies
Peace Studies        
Systems Analysis

MIGC 2016 Schedule

Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference 2016 Schedule

Friday, February 19

8 – 9am                     Registration and Breakfast Gathering
                                   Center for 21st Century Studies,
                                   9th Floor Conference Room

9 – 9:30am                Welcome

9:30 – 11am                Panel 1: Interfacing, Curtin Hall 124

                                   Joshua Kruszynski, Kent State University
                                           “Cognitive Stress, Biofeedback and Adaptive User Interfaces”

                                    Nichali Ciaccio, UWM
                                          “Using Visual Systems Mapping to Manage Complexity (with a deep dive into development narratives)”

                                    Alex Urban, UWM
                                           "Monsters in the Dark: Eavesdropping on Binary Black Hole Mergers at the LIGO Livingston Observatory"

11 – 11:15am                Short Break

     11:15am – 12:45pm    Panel 2: Eco-criticism, Curtin Hall 175                          

     Storm Pilloff, UWM
            “Trans: National, Material, and Gender     in Karen Tei Yamashita’s Through the Arc of
            the Rain Forest.”

                         Cameron Kunzelman, Georgia State University
                                    “The Process of Decay: Bioshock 2 and the Waning of the  Human”

                                   Carter Reitman, UWM
                                           “I Have No Memory of This Place: The Production of Space in Karen Tei Yamashita’s Through the Arc of the Rain Forest.”

12:45 – 1:45pm          Brown Bag Lunch, Curtin Hall 368
                                   Discussion on "The Gravity of Things" with Dr. Levi Bryant

1:45 – 3:15pm             Panel 3: Consumption, Curtin 175

                                    Scott Radunzel, University of St. Thomas
                                           “The Cognitive Dissonance of China Mieville’s ‘The City & the City’”

                                   Michael Beebe, UWM
                                           “Narratives of Progress: Master of None and Serial Storytelling in the Binge-Viewing Era”

                                   Tim Bavlnka, UWM
                                           “The Denial of Deathmatches”

3:15 – 3:30pm             Short Break

3:30 – 5:30pm            Keynote: Dr. Levi Bryant (Collin College), Curtin 175

                                     "The Interior of Things"

7pm – 10pm                Creative Showcase and Reception
                                     Polish Falcons Hall, 801 E. Clarke St.
                                     Visiting Artist: Jon Satrom and Jason Soliday

Graduate Performances

Franklin K.R. Cline, UWM
Poetry, “TDB: Poems by Franklin K.R. Cline”

Sky Hopinka, UWM
Video, “Jáaji Approx.”

Jenni Moody, UWM
Fiction, “Wingspan”

Janelle VanderKelen, UWM
Digital Video, “WorldBuilding”

Mollie Boutell, UWM
Fiction, "Potato Abandoned"

Matt Rossoni, UWM
Live 16mm projection performances,
“Parade #8”
“Bag of Film”

 

Saturday, February 20

9am – 10am                Breakfast, Curtin 181

10:00am – 11:45am     Panel 4: Identity and Self-Transformation

                                     Matthew Burchanoski, Marquette Univeristy
                                          “Specters of Postmodernism: Toni Morrison’s Jazz and Philosophy

                                     Neal Swisher, Virginia Commonwealth University
                                          “Becoming a Self in the Age of the Quantified Body”

                                     Olivia Duell, UWM
                                          “Building the Pop Music Empire: A Pop Star’s Process of Becoming an Intertextual Commodity”

                                     Trevor Sprague, UWM
                                          “Processes of Assessment in Composition: The Politics of ‘Media’ and ‘Mode’”

11:45pm – 12:45pm   Lunch, Curtin 368

1pm – 4pm                  Workshop: Dr. Nick Montfort (MIT)
                                     Digital Humanities Lab

4pm – 4:30pm             Snacks

4:30pm – 5:00 pm      Closing Remarks

7pm – 9pm                  Reception
                                     Riverwest Public House, 815 E. Locust St.
                                      Feat. DJ Fuzzy Logic

MIGC 2015 Schedule

MIGC15: UNBEARABLE Program of Events

The Tenth Annual Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference (MIGC)

University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, February 20th & 21st 2015

#migc15

Friday 2/20/15

 

8:00 – 8:30 Registration & Breakfast

175 Curtin Hall

 

8:30 – 10:00 Panel: Creatures

175 Curtin Hall

Panel Chair: Nigel Rothfels / UWM / Animal Studies

Graduate Student Respondent: Claire Barber-Stetson / University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign / English

 

"The World-Against-Us: Horror Between Politics and Ontology"

Quinn Lester / Political Science / Johns Hopkins University

 

“Singular Creatures: Animality, the Anthropocene, and Our Encounters with Unbearability”

Michael Uhall / Political Science / University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

“Who’s Monster? A Re-Telling of the Frankenstein Myth”

Daniel Lovejoy / Humanities / San Francisco State University

 

“War, Gore, and the Unbearable: Attack on Titan’s Brutality”

Thad Furman / English / University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

 

 

10:15 – 11:30 Panel: Trajectories of Time

175 Curtin Hall

Panel Chair: Ted Martin / Assistant Professor of English / UWM

Graduate Student Respondent: Chase Erwin / English / UWM

 

“Octavia Butler’s Anti-Utopia: Neoliberalism, the End of History, and Utopian Impulse in the Parable Series”

Chris Carpenter / English / University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

 

“Screening the Unbearable: Traumatic Identification with Tom Kalin's Savage Grace”

Laura Stamm / Film Studies / University of Pittsburgh

 

“Dumpster Babies, Garbage Pail Kids: 'It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia,' Samuel Beckett’s 'Endgame,' and Post-Bourgeois Existence in the Trash”

Michael Beebe / English / University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

 

 

12:00 – 1:30 Brown Bag Lunch with Lauren Berlant & Lee Edelman

(bring your own lunch)

Pre-circulated reading: excerpt of  Sex, Or the Unbearable

Reading available here: http://www4.uwm.edu/c21/pdfs/migc/2015/sotu.pdf

(copies also available at registration table)

Center for 21st Century Studies, Curtin Hall 939

 

 

1:45 – 3:15 Panel: Illness

175 Curtin Hall

Panel Chair: Kumkum Sangari / Professor of English / UWM

Graduate Student Respondent: Frankie Mastrangelo / English / UWM

 

“AIDS and Marriage: Rejecting Stealth Heteronormativity”

Robert Lipscomb / English / University of Nebraska – Lincoln

 

“Dangerous Intimacies: The Transformative Power of the Orisa of Disease”

Fernanda Villarroel / Art History / University of Wisconsin – Madison

 

“The Unbearable Heaviness of Death: On Sophie Calle Filming Her Mother's Last Breaths"

Giulia Danti / Visual Arts / Università di Bologna, Italy

 

“Auroratone: Investigating Psychiatric Rehabilitation through Synesthesia”

Alexandra Fine / Cultural Studies / University of California-Davis

 

 

 

3:15-3:30 Break (coffee available)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3:30 – 5:00 Keynote Presentation

Welcome: Richard Grusin/Professor of English & Director of C21/UWM

Opening Remarks: Ali Sperling/MIGC Chair,Ph.D. student, English/UWM

Introductions: Jane Gallop /Distinguished Professor of English /UWM

 

 Lauren Berlant / University of Chicago

&

Lee Edelman / Tufts University

“The Unbearable, a Postscript”

175 Curtin Hall

 

 

5:30 – 7:00 BREAK

(Dinner served at 6pm before the Creative Showcase – see flyer in program)

 

 

7:00 – 9:30 Creative Showcase “UNBEARABLE”

Tamales and beverages served at 6:00pm

@ Microlights (2541 Bremen St., Riverwest neighborhood)

Food @ 6:00pm / Show @ 7:00pm

!!Featuring!! a special screening of the short films of:

Malic Amalya/ MFA University of Illinois at Chicago, MA in History and Theory of Contemporary Art, San Francisco Art Institute

**filmmaker in attendance**

 

~But First~ MIGC performances, readings, and screenings by Cassandra Troyan (UChicago), Matt Rossoni (UWM), Katy Rossing (Alabama), Katharine Monger (UWM), Janelle VanderKelen (UWM), Leigh Hellman (University of Illinois at Chicago), Anna Vitale (UW Madison), and Frankie Mastrangelo and Franklin K.R. Cline (UWM),

Host and MC: Ben Balcom

 

Free and open to the public. Space is limited to first 60 people, so arrive early.

 

 

Saturday 2/21/15

 

8:00 – 8:30: Coffee and breakfast

175 Curtin Hall

 

 

8:30 – 10:30:  Panel: Limits of Media

175 Curtin Hall

Panel Chair: Anne Wysocki / Professor of English / UWM

Graduate Student Responder: Kris Purzycki / English / UWM

 

“Beyond Scarcity and Precariousness: a Report on Brazilian Modding Strategies”

José Carlos Messias / Communication / Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

 

“Raspberry Pi”  / A Short Video

Allain Daigle / English / University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

 

“The Unbearable Experience of the Videogame”

Cameron Kunzelman / Moving Image Studies / Georgia State University

 

 

10:45 – 12:15: Concurrent Events

 

Event One

Lightening Round: A Collaborative Speed Workshop

382 Curtin Hall

Graduate Student Moderator: Ali Sperling / UWM

 

Kelly Cooper / English / University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Sun Young Lee / Curriculum & Instruction / University of Wisconsin - Madison

Edilene Silva / Information Science / Federal University of Pariaba, Brazil

Katherine Glanz / Political Science / Johns Hopkins University

Daniela Miranda / English / Washington State University

Mark Brand / English / University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Vincent Adiutori / English / University of Illinois at Chicago

Christina Belcher / English / University of Southern California

Corrine Ehrfurth / Curriculum & Instruction / University of Wisconsin Madison

Amelia Hruby / Philosophy / DePaul University

Sun-Ha Hong / Communication / University of Pennsylvania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Two

A Roundtable

“How Interdisciplinary Perspectives Can Bring Change and Action

Through Intergroup Dialogue”

A University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Panel

Disability Studies and UIC's Intergroup Dialogue Initiative

175 Curtin Hall

Panel Moderator: Emily Clark / Deputy Director, Center for 21st Century Studies

Graduate Student Responder: Sarah O’Connell  / English

 

Chloe Gurin-Sands / Public Health / UIC

Opening discourse about lived experiences, power, and privilege is an important part of working with communities to improve health outcomes and address the root causes of health disparities.

 

Stephanie Hicks /Educational Policies Studies / UIC

The opportunity to develop and implement critical pedagogy that moves students and educators to build more just society is what drives her participation in the Dialogue Initiative.

 

Liz Thomson / Disability Studies / UIC

Draws from the mantra, “Nothing about us; without us” and the inherent interdisciplinarity to inform their perspective on dialogue.

 

 

 

12:15 – 1:15 A Provided Lunch

Free lunch from Beans and Barley for all conference registrants, respondents, panel chairs, and Hosts

Sponsored by The Graduate School and the Office of Research

368 Curtin Hall

 

 

1:15 – 2:30 Panel: The Body on Screen

Curtin 175

Panel Chair: Carl Bogner / Department of Film / UWM

Graduate Student Respondent: Ben Balcom / MFA in Experimental Film / UWM

 

“The Unbearable origin of Human Sexuality: A Philosophical Analysis of Teorema”

Andrea Nicolini / Philosophy, Psychology, Education / University of Verona, Italy

 

“What is Lost in Cohesion: Guilt & Shame in David Cronenberg’s ‘Maps to the Stars’”

Toby Wiggins / Gender, Feminist, and Women’s Studies / York University, Canada

 

“All About Overload:” Hysterical Literature and the Ethics of Distraction”

Gordon Sullivan / English / University of Pittsburgh

 

Q & A

 

A Live Performance with Video Component: “Untitled”

Neil Gravander / Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres / UWM

 

Q & A

 

 

2:30-3:00pm Installation Artist Walk-and-Talk (coffee also available)

Please take the time to visit the installation artists by their work

 

Phyllis Schlessinger / University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

Ceramics Installation: “Broken, Target, Guns Don’t Kill, People Do”

 

Corinne Ehrfurth / University of Wisconsin – Madison

Photography: “By Dint of a Secret Heliotropism”

 

Sarika Gongalla / Missouri Western State University

Acrylic on Canvas: “Nostalgic Memories”

 

Vanessa Carlisle / University of Southern California

“Revolutionary Greetings: A Participatory Installation”

 

Sunny Reddy Medapati / Missouri Western State University

Digital Projection: “Pixel Art”

 

Mike Hodzinski / University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Side Room, Curtin 175a

Participatory Sound Installation:

“germanPlayfulSistersGroup: readOnly[1-1-1] 120 bpm”

 

 

 

3:00 – 4:15 Panel: Against the State

175 Curtin Hall

Panel Chair: Ivan Ascher / Assistant Professor of Political Science / UWM

Graduate Student Responder: Kal Heck / UWM / English

 

“Unbearable Silences: Violence, Art, and Interpretation in Anil’s Ghost by Michael Ondaatje”

Sylvia Wolak / English / University of Illinois

 

Creative Non-Fiction: “hungry ghosts” (part II)

Leigh Hellman / English / University of Chicago

 

“Loving the Unbearable Archive, Repair in the Unbearable Present”

David Seitz / Human Geography, Women & Gender Studies, Sexual Diversity University of Toronto

 

“I Can’t Breathe:” Notes on a Somatic Mode of Critique

Jean-Thomas Tremblay / English / University of Chicago

 

 

4:30 Closing Reflection

Curtin Hall 175

 

~Dinner on your own~

 

8:00 – 10:00pm: AFTER PARTY/ cash bar /

**featuring Prescott Sobol, DJ Fuzzy Logic**

@ Allium

2101 N. Prospect Ave.

Free and open to the public: Please join us!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Warm Thank You:

 

The 2015 MIGC Board

Ali Sperling, Chair

Kris Purzycki, Vice-Chair

Shawna Lipton, Events Coordinator

Jessica Johnston, Hospitality Liaison

 

Our Generous Sponsors

The Vilas Trust

The Center for 21st Century Studies

The Division of Student Affairs

The College of Letters and Sciences

The Graduate School

The Office of Research

The UWM Department of English

The Year of the Humanities

 

Book Display

People’s Books Co-Op

 

Host & Support of Creative Showcase

Ben Balcom

Microlights

Milwaukee LGBT Film/Video Festival

 

The Center for 21st Century Studies

Richard Grusin

Emily Clark

Annette Hess

John Blum

 

Faculty Panel Chairs

Graduate Student Respondents

 

Poster Designer: Purr Drumey

 

MIGC Volunteers and Hosts           

Sarah O’Connell

Ahmed Teleb

Frankie Mastrangelo

Chris Carpenter

Chris Williams

Bridget Kies

EJ Basa

Bob Bruss

Kizzy Fay

Caitlin Scarano

Tobias Wray

Kristi Prins

Geoff Kinzer

Jeremy Carnes

Allain Daigle

Natalie Goodman

Paul Gagliardi

Eric Herhuth

Kalling Heck

Mary Clinkenbeard

Chase Erwin

Ching-In Chen

Molly McCourt

Justin Schumaker

Franklin K.R. Cline

Kristen Ravel
Anne-Marie Blanchard

Thad Furman

 

Program Designers:

Eddie Chapman

Mike Hodzinksi

 

 

MIGC 2014 CFP

CFP: "ANIMACY" featuring keynote Mel Y. Chen / February 20-22 2014

Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference (MIGC) / University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

themigc@gmail.com

MIGC 2014
“ANIMACY”
February 20th – 22nd, 2014
University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee
CALL FOR PAPERS

Keynote Speaker: Mel Y Chen, UC Berkeley, author of Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial
Mattering, and Queer Affect, (Duke University Press 2012).

Also featuring:
Laura Micciche, University of Cincinnati, author of Doing
Emotion: Rhetoric, Writing, Teaching (Boynton/Cook 2007).
Plenary speaker Ben Woodard, Ph.D. candidate, University of Western Ontario
Workshop led by Zach Blas, Ph.D. candidate, Duke University

The Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference (MIGC) 2014 invites submissions across disciplines and fields that engage with the idea of “ANIMACY” in culture and theory. Derived from linguistics, “animacy” is the condition of being alive or animate, and serves in grammar as a way to classify or rank words on this basis (OED). Yet the rich and overlapping senses of “animacy”, e.g. animate, animation, animus, and animal, reveal the term to more broadly encompass notions of agency, expressivity, sentience, cognizance, and mobility. These notions are often categorized hierarchically, and are saturated with social, cultural, and political implications. Animacy is being increasingly invoked in contemporary discourses of posthumanist and nonhumanist theory, critical ethnic studies, affect theory, object-oriented ontology, queer theory, disability studies, animal studies, eco-criticism, etc. Animacy is a way of troubling the binary of animate vs. inanimate, and instead suggests a more complex system of inter-relatedness between things.
Theorist Mel Y. Chen observes that this “fragile division between animate and inanimate…beyond human and animal -- is relentlessly produced and policed,” and this conference seeks to expose the complex political, social, even personal consequences of this division. How do issues of race, ability, sex, class, or age further test the boundaries of the human? What happens when the categorizations of human, animal, and object are no longer cleanly distinct from one another? As Chen’s book asks, how does matter that is considered immobile, insensate, or deathly, animate our cultural lives?
This two-day conference welcomes and encourages research across disciplines to collectively consider, question, and critique “animacy” in theory, art, literature, music, architecture, philosophy, ecology, medicine, anthropology, art history, sociology, media, psychology, mathematics, history, biology and other sciences, etc. This conference will also present an evening of creative performances, readings, and installations. Please see the call for creative work here:

Topics include, but are not limited to:

-Theories of animality and animal studies
-Theories of hybridity
-Affect studies
-Pedagogical issues of animacy, affect, or emotion
-Animacy and disability studies
-Animacy and age
-Illness and animacy
-Necropolitics
-“Bare life”
-“Vibrant matter” and eco-criticism (Bennett)
-New Materialisms, including feminist new materialisms
-Media studies and vitality
-“Naturecultures”
-Agential realism
-Assemblages
-Humanness as a construct
-Gaming and animacy
-Comic Studies
-Cybernetics or “bodies in code”
-Neuroscience
-Biological animacies
-Film and animation studies
-Digital animacies
-New Materialisms including feminist new materialisms
-Animacy, ethnic studies, and race
-Queer animacies
-Animacy and philosophy
-Animacy and linguistics

Please email 300-word submissions for individual papers, panels, roundtables, or other formats to: themigc@gmail.com by November 20th, 2013. In your submission, please include a title, institutional affiliation, department, and whether you are a MA or PhD student.

The ninth annual Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference is supported by the Center for 21st Century Studies, the College of Letters and Sciences, and the department of English, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee.

www.themigc.com
@MIGC
#MIGC14

MIGC 2014 CALL FOR CREATIVE WORK

MIGC 2014

ANIMACY

February 21st – 22nd, 2014

University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

CALL FOR CREATIVE PERFORMANCES, READINGS, INSTALLATIONS

           

            The two day Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference (MIGC) invites graduate student proposals for performances, installations, or readings to be presented the evening of Friday, February 21st, on the conference theme ANIMACY. The event will be hosted by Microlights, an open community art and screening venue in the Riverwest neighborhood of Milwaukee. We welcome art installations, short films, dance, comedy acts, slam, music, and readings of any kind that address the conference theme. All performances should be kept between five and ten minutes.

Derived from linguistics, “animacy” is the condition of being alive or animate, and serves in grammar as a way to classify or rank words on this basis (OED). Yet the rich and overlapping senses of “animacy”, e.g. animate, animation, animus, and animal, reveal the term to more broadly encompass notions of agency, expressivity, sentience, cognizance, and mobility. These notions are often categorized hierarchically, and are saturated with social, cultural, and political implications. Animacy is being increasingly invoked in contemporary discourses of posthumanist and nonhumanist theory, critical ethnic studies, affect theory, object-oriented ontology, queer theory, disability studies, animal studies, eco-criticism, etc. Animacy is a way of troubling the binary of animate vs. inanimate, and instead suggests a more complex system of inter-relatedness between things. As theorist and keynote Mel Y. Chen’s book asks, how does matter that is considered immobile, insensate, or deathly, animate our cultural lives?

 

Please send a proposal that includes a short description of the intended piece and its relation to the conference theme ANIMACY to themigc@gmail.com by November 20th, 2013. If possible, please include a sample of a past work(s) presented or displayed. Please include in your submission a title, your institutional affiliation, department, degree, and a CV. In addition, please list the length of your performance (5 or 10 minutes) as well as any needs that your piece requires, i.e. wall dimensions, floor space, microphone, other technological needs, etc. We hope that all artists can be present at this event, but it is not required.

 

 

MIGC 2014 Schedule

PROGRAM

The Ninth Annual

Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference (MIGC)

University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

February 20th – 22nd 2014

 

#migc14

 

Thursday, 2/20/13

 

3:00 – 3:30 Registration

118 Curtin Hall

 

3:30-5:00 Plenary:

Introduced by Jessica Nastal

 

Laura Micciche / Associate Professor of English / U of Cincinnati

“Writing and Animal Companionship”

118 Curtin Hall

 

 

Friday 2/21/13

 

8:30 – 9:00 Registration, Breakfast Snacks, and Coffee

175 Curtin Hall

 

9:00 – 11:45 Plenary Workshop: Zach Blas / Duke University / Literature Eyebeam Resident

“Facial Weaponization Suite: A Mask-Making Workshop”

368 Curtin Hall

 

12:00 – 1:15 Brown Bag Lunch with Mel Y. Chen (bring your own lunch!)

Pre-circulated reading: “Title of circulated piece”

Reading will be available this week at www.themigc.com

(copies also available at registration table)

Center for 21st Century Studies, Curtin Hall 9th floor

 

 

1:15 – 1:30 Coffee Break (Registration Open)

175 Curtin Hall

 

 

1:30 – 3:00 PANEL: “Comprehending Color”

175 Curtin Hall

Chair: Jane Gallop / Professor of English / UWM

Graduate Student Responder: Andy Hartman

 

“Flaming Colors: Queer Forms and Affective Surfaces in the Work of Lynda Benglis”

Lex Lancaster / Art History / University of Wisconsin – Madison

 

“Unintelligible White Bombers: Animus & Deadly Boundaries”

Melinda Q. Brennan / Gender Studies / Indiana University

 

“Violence, the Ocean, and the Semiotics of Blackness in Frank Ocean’s ‘Swim God’”

Chad B. Infante / English / Northwestern University

 

 

3:00 – 3:30: Artist Walk-and-Talk (Coffee also available)

Curtin 175

Installation work on display by:

Ben Balcom / Film @ UWM

Sabrina Scott / Environmental Studies @ York University

Chadwick Noellert / Art @ UWM

Megan Bigelow / Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies @ CUNY Graduate Center

 

 

3:30 – 5:00 KEYNOTE:

Opening remarks: Richard Grusin

Introduced by Ali Sperling

 

 Mel Y. Chen / University of California Berkeley

“Temporal Politics, Scholarship, and the Protean ‘Posthuman’”

175 Curtin Hall

 

 

5:00 – 6:00 BREAK

 

 

6:00 – 9:00 Creative Showcase “ANIMACY” / Tamales and beverages served 6-7

Microlights (2541 Bremen St., Riverwest neighborhood)

Food @ 6:00pm / Show @ 7:00pm

!!Featuring!! a special screening of the short films of Duke and Battersby

 

~Followed by~ MIGC performances and screenings by Anna Vitale (UW-Madison), Carina Gia (UWM), Lindsay Daigle (UWM), Lindsay Allgood (Oklahoma), Jeremy Bryan (UWM), and Ching-In Chen (UWM), Nicki Werner (Redline Resident), Janelle VanderKelen (UWM)

MC: Ben Balcom

 

Free and open to the public. Space is limited to first 55 people, so arrive early.

 

Saturday 2/22/13

 

8:00 – 8:45: Coffee and breakfast

175 Curtin Hall

 

8:45 – 10:15:  PANEL: “Living Technologies”

175 Curtin Hall

Chair: Patrick Lichty / Artist, Curator, Theorist / Lecturer / Peck School of the Arts

Graduate Student Responder: Justin Schumaker

 

“New Materialism and Professional Writing Technologies”

Avery Edenfield / English / University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

 

“Videogames are Alive (This is Not a Metaphor)”

Cameron Kunzelman / Moving Image Studies / Georgia State University

 

“What a Racist Camera: Elucidating the Invisible Norm of Face Detection Technology”

Emily K. Holmes / Visual and Critical Studies / California College of the Arts

 

10:30 – 11:45: CONCURRENT PANELS:

 

“Commodity Culture and Collapse”

118 Curtin Hall

Chair: Joe Austin / Professor of History / UWM

Graduate Student Responder: Kalling Heck

 

 

“Commodity Integrity According to the Toy Story Trilogy: Computer Animation, the Uncanny, and the Fetishistic Reclamation of Aura”

Eric Herhuth / English / University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee / @eherhuth

 

“I Like to Watch: Playing Homo Sacer with Suicide Cults”

Matthew Boman / English / University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

 

“The Politics of Waste: A Cultural History of Waste Disposal and Recycling Practices in Modern Households”

Laura Moisi / Humboldt University of Berlin

 

 

 

“Performing the Body”

175 Curtin Hall

Chair: Gerry Canavan / Assistant Professor of English / Marquette

Graduate Student Responder: Michael Beebe

 

                       

“But Who the Set and What the Actors?: The Blurring of the Animate/Inanimate Binary in the Triumphal Arch as Monumental Proscenium Space”

Janelle VanderKelen / Art and Design / University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

 

“CYBORG ALICE: Cyborgs and Erin Courtney’s The Service Road

Joshua Bastian Cole / Speech, Communication, & Theater Arts / CUNY @jbastiancole

 

“ ‘She Left Her Groome an Yron Man’: Humanity and Inter-humanity in Faerie Queen V

Ian DeJong / English / Marquette University

@ThePontificator

 

“Embodiment Blues: Animating Metaphors on Disease and Vulnerability in Derek Jarman’s Blue

Anton Stuebner / Visual and Critical Studies / California College of the Arts

 

11:45 – 12:45: LUNCH

Provided by the Center for 21st Century Studies

Free for all conference registrants, responders, and panel chairs

118 Curtin Hall

 

12:45 – 1:25: Graduate Student Plenary:

Introduced by Ali Sperling

Ben Woodard / Theory and Criticism / U. of Western Ontario

@naughthought

“Thinking Thought as Motion: Schelling and the Consequences of Abstraction”

175 Curtin Hall

 

 

1:30 – 2:45: CONCURRENT PANELS

 

 

 

“Animality”

Chair: Emily Clark / English / Deputy Director @ C21

Graduate Student Responder: Kara Van de Graaf

175 Curtin Hall

 

“The Order of Animacy in The Island of Doctor Moreau

Shailen Mishra / English / Illinois State University

 

“Hybrid Metaphors: On the Mixing of Animals, Language, and Media”

Benjamin Schultz-Figueroa / Film and Digital Media / UC Santa Cruz

 

“Dogs, Robots, and Border Wars: Toward Intersections Rather than Boundaries”

Maria Lux / Art / University of Illinois Urbana – Champaign

 

 

 

“Spectral Embodiments”

Chair: Annie McClanahan / Assistant Professor of English / UWM

Graduate Student Respondent: Mike Sanders

118 Curtin Hall

 

“Screening the Body / Screening the Soul: On Body Scans, Biometrics, and Becoming a Subject”

Alex Fine / Visual and Critical Studies / California College of the Arts

 

“Understanding Magic Through Literatures of Animacy”

Sabrina Scott / Environmental Studies / York University @sabrinadraws

 

“How Not to Survive a Plague: Bugchasing, Virtuality, Asceticism”

Joseph C. Russo / Anthropology / University of Texas, Austin

 

 

3:00 – 4:15: PANEL

“Deathly Life”

175 Curtin Hall

Chair: Pete Sands / Associate Professor of English / UWM

Graduate Student Responder: Adam Ochonicky

 

“Re-Animating the Corpse in the Latin American Necrophilic Imagination”

Bernabe Mendoza / Comparative Literature / Rutgers University

 

“Incomprehensible Little Problematics”: Performing the Afterlives of the Aztec Archive”

Ann M. Garascia / University of California Riverside / English

 

“Strike a Pose – and Kill Zombies Without Moving a Muscle: JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure, Limited Animation and Liveness”

Kerin Ogg / Film and Media Studies / Wayne State University

 

 

 

 

 

4:30 Closing Remarks

Rebekah Sheldon / Adjunct Assistant Professor

Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis

 

 

4:45 – 6:00: Faculty Roundtable / Q & A

~A Conference Reflection~

Featuring Mel Y. Chen (Women’s and Gender Studies), Laura Micciche (English), Aims McGuiness (History), Richard Grusin (English), Kennan Ferguson (Political Science), Nigel Rothfels (Animal Studies/Independent Scholar)

 

Moderated by Rebekah Sheldon

Curtin 175

 

6:00 – 8:00: DINNER BREAK

 

8:00 – 10:00pm: AFTER PARTY/ cash bar

@ Allium

2101 N. Prospect Ave.

Free and open to the public: Please join us!

 

2014 MIGC Creative Night Showcase

@ Microlights 

 

THEMIDWESTINTERDISCIPLINARYGRADUATECONFERENCE PRESENTS

THE MIGC14 CREATIVE SHOWCASE:

ANIMACY

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 21ST 2014 /6:00PM /DOORS AND REFRESHMENTS /7:00PM SHOW
MICROLIGHTS 2541 BREMEN ST., RIVERWEST, MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

//DUKE AND BATTERSBY SCREENING

“CURIOUS ABOUT EXISTENCE” (2003) 11 MINUTES “BEAUTY PLUS PITY” (2009) 14 MINUTES
“LESSER APES” (2011) 13 MINUTES

INTERMISSION
//LINDSEY ALLGOOD (UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA)

“TINY METAMORPHOSES”/ PERFORMANCE AND VIDEO EMPHASES 8 MINUTES //CHING-IN CHEN (UWM/KUNDIMAN/VONA/MARCONDO/LAMBDA)

“ANIMATING THE MONSTER(S)”/ READING PERFORMANCE 10 MINUTES //NICKI WERNER (REDLINE MILWAUKEE)

“HILARY, LIZZIE, AND I” /PERFORMANCE 12 MINUTES //LINDSAY DAIGLE (UWM)

“POEM-ING RADIOHEAD: EKPHRASTIC RESPONSES TO ALBUM COVERS” / POETRY READING 10 MINUTES //JANELLE ROSE VANDERKELEN (UWM)

“A GENTLEWOMAN’S STRIPTEASE” /VIDEO DOCUMENTATION OF PERFORMANCE 8 MINUTES //ANNA VITALE (UW-MADISON)

“STREET VEIW LYRIC” VIDEO/PERFORMANCE 10 MINUTES //JEREMY BRYAN (UWM)

“AMPLIFIED AFFECT” MUSICAL PERFORMANCE /FREESTYLE 10 MINUTES //CARINA GIA (UWM)

“STRAYS” /POETRY READING 10 MINUTES


 

A Warm Thank You:

 

Sponsors

 

The Center for 21st Century Studies

The Division of Student Affairs

The Office of the Provost

The College of Letters and Sciences

The Graduate School

The UWM Department of English

 

MIGC Invited Speakers

 

Mel Y. Chen

Laura Micciche

Zach Blas

Ben Woodard

 

 

Host Venue of Creative Showcase 

Microlights

  

The Center for 21st Century Studies

 

Richard Grusin

Emily Clark

Annette Hess

John Blum

 

MIGC Volunteers and Hosts                                               

Ali Sperling

Jessica Nastal

Ben Balcom

Josh Weissbach

Ching-In Chen

Rachael Sullivan

Kristin Ravel

Eric Herhuth

Kalling Heck

Chase Erwin

Shawna Lipton

Katherine Wilson

EJ Basa

Loretta McCormick

Andy Hartman

Kristopher Purzycki

Bri Cavallaro

Molly McCourt

Justin Schumaker

Katie Morrissey

Adam Ochonichy

Ron Felten

Mollie Boutell

 

Art Installation Coordinator:

Chadwick Noellert

Program Designer:

Eddie Chapman